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Jack Gallant can read your mind. Or at least, he can figure out what you’re seeing if you’re in his machine watching a movie he’s playing for you.

Gallant, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, has a brain decoding machine – a device that uses brain scanning to peer into people’s minds and reconstruct what they’re seeing. If mind-reading technology like this becomes more common, should we be concerned? Ask Gallant this question, and he gives a rather unexpected answer. Read More…

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New technologies for monitoring brain activity are generating unprecedented quantities of information. That data may hold new insights into how the brain works – but only if researchers can interpret it. To help make sense of the data, neuroscientists can now harness the power of distributed computing with Thunder, a library of tools developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus. Read More…

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Researchers in the field of neuroscience have thought long and hard about the mystery of how our brains process emotions, but it took a team of researchers at Cornell University to finally solve the puzzle. It turns out the answer lies in viewing finely grained patterns of brain activity as a neural code that records people’s subjective feelings.

If two people enjoy similar activities, then it is because they have similar patterns of brain activity, explained neuroscientist Adam Anderson, an associate professor of human development at Cornell and the lead author of the recently published study on the subject. He noted that his findings refute scientists’ long-held belief that the brain represents emotions simply by activating specialized regions for either positive or negative responses. Read more