Theopia Jackson, PhD

Theopia Jackson, PhD

Theopia Jackson, PhD, is the Program Director for Saybrook University Department of Humanistic and Clinical Psychology. She is a licensed clinical psychologist at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland in the Healthy Hearts program. In addition, she is the Co-Chair of the Education & Training committee for the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi), as well as the President for the Bay Area chapter. Dr. Jackson has a long history of providing child, adolescent, and family therapy services; training/supervising psychology practicum students, interns, and fellows; and specializes in serving populations coping with chronic illness and complex trauma. At Saybrook University, she teaches several clinical courses and supervises dissertation/master students; she served as the past Assistant Chair of Psychology and, prior to that, as the Assistant Academic Dean/Dean of Students. Dr. Jackson received her master’s degree in psychology from Howard University in Washington, DC and a doctorate in clinical psychology from The Wright Institute in Berkeley, CA. She is a member of the Association of Family Therapists of Northern California (co-founding member of the Cultural Accountability Committee), American Psychological Association (Division 32 Society for Humanistic Psychology), Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and on the board of directors for BayKids and medical advisory council for the Sickle Cell Community Advisory Council (SCCAC). Additionally, Dr. Jackson is published scholar-practitioner who provides cultural competency workshops/seminars and has been invited to participate in several national and local initiatives intended to establish integrative health care that is culturally-attuned and linguistically responsive.  Dr.  Jackson is committed to serving children, adolescents, and their families in diverse settings with special interest in the adaptability of Western psychological theories/interventions within diverse multicultural contexts and the integration of cultural/creative healing practices.  Though psychodynamically trained, African-centered theory, multiculturalism, family systems theory, humanistic perspectives, relational theory/feminist thinking, and narrative approaches (social justice) inform her clinical practice.  Most importantly, Dr. Jackson is a wife, mother of 3, oldest of 6 from a single-parent household, and a life-learner who believes that professional knowledge both shapes and is shaped by community wisdom.